Guide Managing RAID on Linux: Fast, Scalable, Reliable Data Storage

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Thus, more space and speed can be used to read and write data. It can work on any operating system. Replacing failed disk is simple — Just plug it out and put in a new one. The cost is lower because no additional hardware RAID controller is required.

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It also permits users to reconfigure arrays without being restricted by the hardware RAID controller. Since some processing power is taken by the software, read and write speeds of your RAID configuration, along with other operations carried out on the server can be slowed down by it. Software RAID is often specific to the operating system being used, so it cannot generally be used for partitions that are shared between operating systems. Replacing failed disk in the software RAID is a bit more complex. Minimum number of disks: 2 Pros: Increased performance Write and read speeds.

Cons: No redundancy.

Configure Software RAID on Linux

RAID 1 writes and reads identical data to pairs of drives. If any of the disks in the array fails, the system can still access data from the remaining disk s. Once you replace the faulty disk with a new one, the data is copied to it from the functioning disk s to rebuild the array.


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RAID 1 is the easiest way to create failover storage. Minimum number of disks: 2 Pros: Fault tolerance and easy data recovery.

RAID 5 vs RAID 10: Recommended RAID For Safety and Performance

Increased read performance. Cons: Lower usable capacity.

Higher cost per megabyte double the amounts of drives is required to achieve desired capacity. Business use: Standard application servers where data redundancy and availability is important. See more details on our dedicated server hardware. RAID 5 stripes data blocks across multiple disks like RAID 0, however, it also stores parity information Small amount of data that can accurately describe larger amounts of data which is used to recover the data in case of disk failure.


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  • This level offers both speed data is accessed from multiple disks and redundancy as parity data is stored across all of the disks. If any of the disks in the array fails, data is recreated from the remaining distributed data and parity blocks. It uses approximately one-third of the available disk capacity for storing parity information. Minimum number of disks: 3 Pros: Fault tolerance and increased performance lower than RAID 0 Cons: Lower performance with servers performing large amounts of write operations because of parity overhead.

    Ideal use: File storage servers and application servers. Raid 6 is similar to RAID 5, however, it provides increased reliability as it stores an extra parity block.

    Managing RAID on Linux: Fast, Scalable, Reliable Data Storage - Derek Vadala - Google Books

    That effectively means that it is possible for two drives to fail at once without breaking the array. Cons: Lower performance with servers performing large amounts of write operations because of parity overhead.

    Ideal use: Large file storage servers and application servers. It is best suitable for environments where both high performance and security is required.